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In 1909 Meagher also questioned Birrell in relation to the Flood Estate.[1] He asked the Chief Secretary for Ireland, “if he can say if negotiations for the purchase of the Flood estate, Paulstown, county Kilkenny, have been yet completed; if the Estates Commissioners have acquired, or have taken steps to acquire, the untenanted land on this estate; and, if not, having regard to the large number of uneconomic holdings which; exists on this and neighbouring estates, he will recommend that the Estates Commissioners will take steps to acquire this land, which comprises about 200 acres, with a 613W view to its distribution amongst persons who are entitled under section 2 of the Land Act of 1903 to portions thereof?”

Birrell replied: “This estate is not pending for sale before the Estates Commissioners. If the owner institutes proceedings the property will be dealt with by the Commissioners in its order of priority.”

View House of Commons Debates I & II here and here.


[1] Millbank Systems, compilers. Hansard 1803-2005. House of Commons Debate 1 April 1909 vol 3 cc612-3W http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1909/apr/01/flood-estate-paulstown-county-kilkenny#S5CV0003P0_19090401_CWA_37 : accessed 9 December 2011.

I have previously written an article about the history of quarrying in Paulstown. Recently I came across a book from the early 19th century which goes into a little more detail about wages, costs and sales prices for Paulstown limestone in that era. [1]

You can read the book here.


[1] Wakefield, Edward. 1812. An account of Ireland: Statistical and Political Volume I. London: Longman et al. p.123.

I have previously written an article about Michael Byrne, who was a passenger on the Lusitania when it sank in 1915. After surviving the attack he made his way to Paulstown to stay with relations. You can read the full article here.

More specific genealogical information about Michael Byrne can be found on a website that has transcribed records from the Registration of Americans Citizens forms that were filed at the United States Consulates in Ireland.[1]

The entry states that he was born on 15 May 1868 in the Carrick-on-Suir area of Co. Tipperary. He married Herminie Rushman who was born at Numberg (Nuremberg?), Germany. The reason for his trip on the Lusitania was ‘commerical business’.


[1] Unknown, Sheila, compiler. Irish Gleanings to Connect People to Townlands in Ireland; Registration of Americans Citizens forms that were filed at the United States Consulates in Ireland                                                                                            http://sites.google.com/site/irishgleanings/home/american-registration-documents : accessed 28 December 2011

Michael Meagher represented the constituency of North Kilkenny from 1906-1918. On 6 February 1908 he put a question to Augustine Birrell, who was Chief Secretary of Ireland at the time. Meager enquired as to why police were sent to a grass letting at Viewmount on the previous January.

He questioned, “I beg to ask the Chief Secretary to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland if he is aware that forces of police were sent from Paulstown, Gowran, and Gores-bridge to assist at a grass-letting at 1103 Viewmount, County Kilkenny, on 22nd January; will he state by whose authority such action was taken; was a breach of the peace apprehended; if so, on what grounds; and, seeing that Kilkenny is one of the most peaceable and law-abiding counties in the United Kingdom, and with a view to prevent a breach of the peace and feelings of bitterness between the authorities and the people, will he see that conduct such as this will not be allowed in future.”[1]

Birrell replied: “A letting by auction of grazing lands at Viewmount was announced for 22nd January. The police authorities had reason to apprehend that the auction might be interfered with, and consequently four policemen were sent to the place for the preservation of the peace. It is the fact that the county of Kilkenny generally is in a most peaceful condition, but in this particular instance precautionary measures were called for. In reply to a further Question the right hon. Gentleman said the police would not have been sent to the auction had not threatening notices been posted.”[2]

To read more about Viewmount House click here.

To read House of Commons Debates 1803-2005 I click here.


[1] Millbank Systems, compilers. Hansard 1803-2005. House of Commons Debate 6 February 1908 vol 183 cc1102-3 http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1908/feb/06/viewmount-grass-letting#S4V0183P0_19080206_HOC_272 : accessed 9 December 2011.

[2]Ibid.

The following names appear on passenger list for ships that sailed into the port of Boston from 1820 – 1943. It was only after the Immigration Act of 1891 that place of origin/ birth information started to appear on passenger lists, so many people from Paulstown could have sailed into Boston before the earliest name listed here.

Thomas Reeves[1]  – Arrived 29 April 1909 on S.S. Iverna from Queenstown, Cork, Ireland

Age: 24 / Male / Single / Occupation: Clerk / Can Read and Write / Nationality: British / Last Permanent Address: Paulstown, Ireland / Name and Complete Address of Nearest Relative: Richard Reeves Paulstown Co. Kilkenny / Final Destination: St. Pauls (Cannot decipher state) / By Whom Was Passage paid: Self / How Much Money In Possession Of: $10 / Whether Ever Before in the U.S: No / Name and Address of Friend or Relative Going to Stay With: Uncle Edward Moylan, 449 Laffan St, St. Pauls / Height: 5’6” / Complexion: Fair / Hair: Fair / Eyes: Grey / Place of Birth: Paulstown.

 

William Upton[2]  – Arrived 13 May 1909 on S.S. Saxonia from Queenstown, Cork, Ireland

Age: 22 / Male / Single / Occupation: Clerk / Can Read and Write / Nationality: British / Last Permanent Address: Bagenalstown / Name and Complete Address of Nearest Relative: Mrs. Upton Paulstown Bagenalstown / Final Destination: New York, NY / By Whom Was Passage paid: Self / How Much Money In Possession Of: $10 / Whether Ever Before in the U.S: No / Name and Address of Friend or Relative Going to Stay With: Friend Edward Butler, 520 East 82nd St, New York / Height: 5’7” / Complexion: Fair / Hair: Fair / Eyes: Green / Place of Birth: Paulstown, Ireland.

 

Bridget Brennan[3] – Arrived 26 October 1923 on S.S. Franconia from Cob, Cork, Ireland

Age: 56 / Female / Widow / Occupation: Wife / Can Read and Write / Nationality: British / Last Permanent Address: Sligo, Ireland / Name and Complete Address of Nearest Relative: Mother Mrs. Dowdall, Upper John St. Sligo / Final Destination: Elsmhurst, Long Island, NY / By Whom Was Passage paid: Self / How Much Money In Possession Of: $50 / Whether Ever Before in the U.S: No / Name and Address of Friend or Relative Going to Stay With: Son William Brennan 55 Boston St, Elmhurst Long Island / Height: 5’5” / Complexion: Fair / Hair: Auburn / Eyes: Blue / Place of Birth: Paulstown, Ireland.


[1] “Boston Passenger and Crew lists 1820-1943”, database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 November 2011), entry for Thomas Reeves; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, 1917-1943; Microfilm Serial: T938; Microfilm Roll: 133.

[2] “Boston Passenger and Crew lists 1820-1943”, database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 November 2011), entry for William Upton; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, 1820-1943; Microfilm Serial: T938; Microfilm Roll: 133.

[3] “Boston Passenger and Crew lists 1820-1943”, database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 November 2011), entry for Bridget Brennan; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, 1917-1943; Microfilm Serial: T938; Microfilm Roll: 288.

Over the last 160 years Paulstown has been mentioned in debates at the House of Commons in London. This is the first of a few posts that will outline when it was discussed.

In 1843 discussions took place in relation to the Arms (Ireland) Bill of the time. Sir Fredrick Stovin, participating in the debate noted how a number of areas in Ireland had sent in petitions to disband yeomanry in the 1830s. He outlined how “on the 27th of August, 1831, Mr. Blackney presented a petition from the inhabitants of Paulstown, for disarming the yeomanry in Ireland.”[1]

To see the minutes of the 1831 petition click here.


[1]Millbank Systems, compilers. Hansard 1803-2005. House of Commons Debate 27 April 1843 volume 68 cc1010-2 http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1843/may/29/arms-ireland-bill#S3V0069P0_18430529_HOC_44: accessed 9 December 2011.

The Loyal National Repeal Association was founded by Daniel O’Connell in the early 1840s. Catholic Emancipation had been achieved in 1829 and this organization was established to build on this momentum. The aim of the organization was to repeal the 1801 Act of Union between Britain and Ireland and to set up a parliament in Dublin.

Funds were collected across Ireland and the world to help aid the organization.  A list of subscribers from Newfoundland, Canada appeared in the 2 September 1843 edition of the Freeman’s Journal. One name on this list is of a man originally from Paulstown, James Summers.[1]


[1]Heaphy, Mary, compiler. Irish Genealogy Project Archives Loyal National Appeal Association – NEWFOUNDLAND Pt 2 from Freeman’s Journal Newspaper 2 September 1842                                                                                                    http://www.igp-web.com/igparchives/ire/countrywide/newspapers/freemans025.txt : accessed 21 November 2011

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