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This is a continuation from Information Wanted Ads I. Please read the first installment for further details and footnote information.

Michael Teahin – 1863                                                                                                                                                                                           Michael Teahin, Paulstown, Kilkenny, Ireland, your son and daughter are in Melbourne depot.[1]

Michael Connors – 1864                                                                                                                                                                                              From the townland of Paulstown, date of departure 1859, first location after arrival was Louisville, Kentucky. Patrick Connors, his brother, seeks information and can be reached at Gold Springs Post Office, Putnam County, New York. Date of advertisement 6 August 1864.

Patrick O’Neill – 1866                                                                                                                                                                                              Seeking person wants information, dead or alive. From the townland of Barnaphea (probably Baurnafea), Paulstown, Co. Kilkenny. Firs location after arrival was Sandfords Corners, NY in July 1855. Next location was Gregisville, Levings Co. NY. Michael O’Neil, his borther, seeks information and can be reached at Sandford Corners, Jefferson Co. NY. Date of advertisement 4 August 1866.

Patrick Phelan – 1877                                                                                                                                                                                           Wanted, Mr. John Nash of Melbourne, formerly of Royal Oak, Co. Carlow, Ireland, who recently communicated with Mr. John Doyle of Balyealls, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland to be good enough to send his address to Patrick Phelan, formerly of Garryduff, parish of Paulstown, Co. Kilkenny, now of Heargraves, near Mudgee, New South Wales.[2]

Patrick Finlay – 1886                                                                                                                                                                                                 Patrick Finlay, White Hall, Paulstown, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland. The last was heard of him thirty years ago eight miles outside of White Plains, NY. Wishes to be found by his sister, Bridget Burns, 168 Richard St, South Brooklyn.[3]


[1] Author Unknown, Missing Friends, Messages Etc. in The Argus, 27 August 1863, p.1; National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au :  accessed 21 July 2011

[2] Author Unknown, Missing Friends, Messages Etc. in The Argus, 26 February 1877, p.1; National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au :  accessed 21 July 2011

[3] Author Unknown, Personal in The New York Herald, 25 August 1886, p.1; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com : accessed 24 May 2011

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One of the main ways that family and friends tried to find people who emigrated to the US or Australia was through ‘Information Wanted’ adverts in different newspapers. Word of mouth was the key with some reunited and others never to be found. Below is a selection of these adverts where Paulstown is mentioned. Some of the people placing adverts wrote that Paulstown was in county Carlow. Varying amounts of information are provided and all entries without a footnote are from the Boston Pilot newspaper.[1]

John Cooke – 1836                                                                                                                                                                                                               Of John Cooke, a native of Shanakil, county Kilkenny, Ireland. When last heard from he was in Boston, his father is now in New York, and is anxious to hear from him. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received, addresses to Lawrence Langton, No 232 Mulberry street, New York.[2]

Michael Dooley – 1850                                                                                                                                                                                                   From the townland of Paulstown, first location after arrival was Fall Springs, Massachusetts. John Dooley, his brother seeks information and can be reached at Michael Hughes, 47 Rensse (St?), Albany, NY. Date of advertisement 21 September 1850

Martin Stanton – 1851                                                                                                                                                                                                 From the towland of Paulstown, Co. Kilkenny, first location after arrival was ONT (Ontario?) in 1848. Last heard from in UCN in 1848. Information sought by Patrick Cane, a cousin, and can be reached at 85 So. 2nd St, New Bedford, MA. Date of advertisement 13 December 1851.

Garrett Healey – 1855                                                                                                                                                                                                 From the townland of Paulstown, Co. Carlow. Information sought by Pierce Healey, a brother. Can be reached at 2 Pleasant St. Court, Boston, MA. Date of advertisement 10 February 1855.

Catherine Doyle – 1856                                                                                                                                                                                                From the townland of Paulstown or Garryduff, intended destination was New York City, arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Sailed on the Winchester, leaving Liverpool in January 1853. Margaret Doyle, her sister, seeks information and can be reached at Patrick O’Carroll, South Trenton, New Jersey. Date of advertisement 15 November 1856.

James Mahon – 1861                                                                                                                                                                                                    From the townland of Grange Lower near Paulstown, barony of Gowran, poor law of Kilkenny, county Kilkenny. Aged 24 and first location after arrival was Ohio. John Nowlan, a friend, seeks information and can be reached at S.Brookfield, MA. Date of advertisement 26 October 1861.


[1] “Information Wanted: A Database of Advertisements for Irish Immigrants Published in the Boston Pilot”, database, Bostoncollege.edu (http://infowanted.bc.edu: accessed 24 May 2011), entries for Paulstown location

[2] Murphy DeGrazia, Laura and Fitzpatrick Haberstroth, Diane. 2005. Voices of The Irish Immigrant: Information Wanted Ads in The Truth Teller New York City 1825-1844.New York: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, p.81.

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During the American Civil War a group emerged in England that was sympathetic to the cause of the Southern Confederacy States. The Southern Independence Association was founded on 9 April 1864[1] and even went as far as trying to get a bill through the British Parliament that called for the British Government to intervene on behalf of the Confederacy.[2] A list of members was printed in the Manchester Guardian newspaper and reprinted in The New York Times in May 1864. Among the names are a number of the Irish based aristocracy, including a member of one of the main landed gentry families of Paulstown. The entry reads:

William Flood, Esq., J.P., Paulstown Castle, Gowran, Kilkenny, Ireland


[1] Author Unknown, Our English Friends in The New York Times, 7 May 1864, p.8 ProQuest Historical Newspapers http://www.proquest.com accessed 18 July 2011

[2] Bateman, Tom. Really Neutral on BBC Radio 4 Website, 2 October 2010; available online at http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_9054000/9054041.stm : accessed 18 July 2010.

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The Irish World Newspaper was published from 1890-1905 and served the Irish community in New York City and beyond. Below are one marriage and five death notices that were published in the paper.

Married – 1890                                                                                                                                                                                                              Patrick Maher and Margaret, only daughter of the late Nicholas Comerford, Killen were married at St. John’s Church on April 15th by Rev. J.P. Mulhall, Paulstown.[1]

Died – 1896                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Mrs. Patrick Rowan of Paulstown, died 26 April, widely respected. Requiem services were held in Paulstown.[2]

Died – 1898                                                                                                                                                                                                                      James Healy Brennan – 6 January at Paulstown Co. Kilkenny. Internment at Paulstown. Office and High Mass were held in the chapel. Funeral largely attended.[3]

Died – 1902                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Mr. Thomas Hanlon of Ennis-Court (probably Fennis Court?), Pugnalstown (probably Bagenalstown?), passed away on 13 April, at the age of 61 years. The Office and high Mass in Paulstown Church and the funeral to Old Leighlin cemetery was very numerously attended.[4]

Died – 1904                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Mr. John Hanlon of Greenwood, Shankill died 11 December to the great sorrow of his family and friends. The funeral took place in Paulstown and was largely attended by all classes. Office and High Mass took place in Paulstown Church. Celebrant Rev E. Hipwell, Goresbridge. The other clergy present were Rev. R. O’Brien, Paulstown; Rev. J. Coyle, Leighlinbridge; Rev. J. Foley, Leighlinbridge; Rev. P. Murphy, Bagenalstown; The chief mourners were: John, Richard, Michael, Patrick and Joseph Maher, sons; Martin Meaney and Simon Meaney, grandsons; Philip Murphy, E. Wynne and J. Wynne, nephews; James, Michael, Thomas and Denis Hoynes, Jeremiah, Philip and Martin Maher, cousins.[5]

Died – 1904                                                                                                                                                                                                                               The death of Mr. Walter Walsh, Courtnabohilla, 23 June occurred. The funeral was one of the largest witnessed for a long time. Rev. Father Lalor of St. Paul’s, Paulstown officiated. Chief mourners: Laurence, Patrick and James Walsh, brothers; Mrs. Murphy and Mrs. Mulrooney, sisters; Thomas and Patrick Walsh, Patrick Ryan, John and Thomas Murphy and C.W. Mulrooney, nephews; Kate, Ellen and Mary T Walsh, Kate and Ellen Ryan, nieces;  Martin Murphy, Edward Mulrooney and Pierce Ryan, brothers-in-law.[6]


[1] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The New Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 15 May 1890, p.2; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

[2] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The New Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 23 May 1896, p.3; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

[3] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The New Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 29 January 1898, p.3; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

[4] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The Irish World (Leinster – Carlow section), 10 May 1902, p.7; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

[5] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 30 January 1904, p.9; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

[6] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 23 July 1904, p.9; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

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On 4 July 1898 Ellen Lawlor, about 70 years of age, was found dead in her home near Paulstown. She had been murdered.[1] While murder has always occurred, no doubt the news of an elderly woman being killed sent shockwaves throughout the area. Patrick Holmes, a farm labourer, and a man by the name of Brophy were caught within a couple of weeks. They were charged with Mrs. Lawlor’s murder and remanded in custody.[2] Lawlor lived alone in a secluded house “from where she ran a huckster’s business and the local people thought her to be a wealthy woman”.[3]

At the Leinster Winter Assizes in Waterford the jury failed to reach a verdict so a second trial was ordered. [4] The evidence presented showed how Holmes robbed her then battered her to death to prevent her identifying him.[5] Before the end of the year Holmes was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged in Kilkenny in January 1899. [6] Kilkenny had long been considered one of the more peaceful counties in Ireland, with the Tithe Wars of the 1830s providing the last serious violence in the county. The authorities had to erect a new scaffold as it was over fifty years since the last execution in the county. Before his execution Holmes left a statement with the governor of the gaol.[7] A man by the name of Scott was the hangman and Holmes “walked firmly to the scaffold and betrayed no emotion”.[8] He was executed on Saturday 7 January 1899.[9]

No mention is made in any of the sources as to what happened Brophy.

[1] Fielding, Steven. 1994. The Hangman’s Record Volume 1. London: Chancery House.

[2] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 20 August 1898, p.3; America’s Historical Newspapers http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 24 May 2011

[3] Fielding, Steven. 1994.

[4] Author Unknown, Execution in Ireland in Western Mail, 9 January 1899, p.5; 19th Century British Newspapers http://www.newspapers.bl.uk :accessed 26 May 2011

[5] Ibid.

[6] Author Unknown, News from Ireland in The Irish World (Leinster – Kilkenny section), 31 December 1898, p.3

[7] Author Unknown, Execution in Ireland in Western Mail, 9 January 1899, p.5

[8] Ibid.

[9] Fielding, Steven. 1994.

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Many areas of the world have historical stories about gangs of bandits and robbers. Depending on the evidence consulted, they can be ruthless killers or Robin Hood type folk heroes. Ireland is no different and there are many examples of Tories[1], highway men and rapparees[2]. One of the most well known bands of outlaws was the Kellymount gang. This group of men committed many robberies in the late 1730s before being captures in 1740.

In the fifth volume of his tome on Irish history, Ireland and Her People, Thomas W.H. Fitzgerald refers to the year 1740 as the year of the “Kellymount gang outrages”.[3] The leader of the gang was a man by the name of Brenan. This name is synonymous with the north Kilkenny area.[4] An unflattering account is given of him in Reilly’s Dublin Newsletter of 1740: “Brenan is said to be a man of very mean appearance, has a freehold of nine pounds per year, near the coal pits, but, renting one of the coal pits, and not succeeding, he started this gang”.[5] From 1738-1740 the gang was said to number about thirty men[6] and roamed areas of counties Kilkenny, Laois, Offaly and as far west as Galway[7].

A more sympathetic view of the gang is given in a 1902 anti-establishment publication: “Their head-quarters seem to have been Coolcullen Wood, about seven miles from Kilkenny……..They were so formidable that a strong military force had to be sent against them. This gang committed no murders, disdained to take anything but money, horses, and sheep; sometimes divided their plunder with the starving people; and had in the outset pledged their honour not to rob any of the gentlemen of the County Kilkenny.”[8]

While the gang members seem to have come from many areas of north Kilkenny, their association with Kellymount most likely comes from them frequenting the area. Just eight years after the demise of the gang a travel writer wrote about visiting an inn in Kellymount that the gang used to regularly frequent.[9] Later in the century, a traveler in Ireland reported in 1791 that he was shown a cave in Kellymount that the gang used as a meeting place.[10]

Eventually, Brenan, and other gang members were captured in Galway and this led to their demise. He was taken to a jail at Nenagh, Tipperary and then onto another jail at Clonmel, Tipperary. Here, in September 1740, he died of the wounds that he sustained during his capture.[11] Darcy, another gang member, was tried in Carlow and hanged with his head fixed on the courthouse.[12]



[1] From the Irish word tóraidhe. Generally meaning a man who is pursued, it was given to soldiers who fought for the Confederacy against Cromwell’s forces and then became outlaws and highwaymen.

[2] From the Irish word ropairí. They were originally Irishmen who fought in the Williamite Wars in the 1690s and were known for fighting with pikes. Subsequently, the term was used for highwaymen

[3] Fitzgerald, Thomas W.H. 1909. Ireland and her people; a library of Irish biography, together with a popular history of ancient and modern Erin, to which is added an appendix of copious notes and useful tables; supplemented with a dictionary of proper names in Irish mythology, geography, genealogy, etc. Volume 5. Chicago: Fitzgerald Book Company. p.786.

[4] MacLysaght, Edward. 1985. The Surnames of Ireland. Dublin: Irish Academic Press.

[5] Madden, Richard Robert. 1867. The History of Irish Periodical Literature form the end of the 17th Century to the middle of the 19th Century. London: T.C. Newby. p.277

[6] Connolly, Sean. 2008. Divided Kingdom: Ireland 1630-1800. Oxford: OUP. p.321.

[7] O’Rourke, John. 1902 (3rd ed, republished in 2008). The History of the Great Famine of 1847. Middlesex: The Echo Library, p.29

[8] Ibid.

[9] Chetwood, W. R., 1748. A Tour through Ireland in Several Entertaining Letters: Wherein the Present State of That Kingdom Is Consider’d … Interspersed with Observations on the Manners, Customs, Antiquities, Curiosities, and Natural History of That Country … London: Printed for J. Roberts

[10] Topham Bowden, Charles. 1791. A tour through Ireland. Dublin: W.Corbett

[11] Madden, Richard Robert. 1867. The History of Irish Periodical Literature from the end of the 17th Century to the middle of the 19th Century. London: T.C. Newby, p.279.

[12] Ibid., p.280

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The following report comes for a 1902 edition of the St. Louis Republic newspaper.[1] Two nuns at the Visitation Convent in St. Louis, Missouri celebrated their golden jubilee on the same day. One of the sisters, Mary Beninga Craden, was reported as having been born in Paulstown 75 years previously, in about 1827. When she was 19 years of age she went to the US, travelling to St. Louis. She stayed with relatives for a number of years before entering the sisterhood in 1850. After their coronation mass a reception was held in their honour.


[1] Author Unknown, Golden Jubliee of Two Sisters in The St. Louis Republic, 29 August 1902, p.14; Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov accessed 17 April 2011

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I have come across two obituaries in newspapers from the state of New York for people who were originally from Paulstown.

The first is for what looks like the name of Michael Fenelon. The page of the newspaper is very worn. He died on 1 September 1891 in Brooklyn, New York City.[1] His parents were James and Catherine Fenelon. He was about 56 years of age when he died and was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, Brooklyn. An address of his last place of residence is given. Again, the page is quite worn here but it looks like 83 Amity St, which is in Brooklyn.

The second is for Catherine O’Haire who died on 3 May 1931 at the age of 92 in the town of Niagara, NY.[2] She was born in the parish of Paulstown about 1839 and came to the United States in 1863. Her husband was John O’Haire and the obituary says that he died 33 years previously. They had two daughters and three sons and she was buried in Riverdale Cemetery.


[1] Author Unknown, Died in Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 2 September 1891, p.5 ; digital image, Fulton History, http://www.fultonhistory.com ; accessed 02 April 2011

[2] Author Unknown, Mrs. O’Haire -92- Dies at Niagara in Niagara Falls Gazette, 4 May 1931; digital image, Fulton History, http://www.fultonhistory.com ; accessed 02 April 2011

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There are a number of articles in various local Australian newspapers about the life of Thomas O’Rourke. He was born in Paulstown on 8 September 1844[1] and emigrated to Australia with his mother, father and sister about December 1867.[2] His three brothers had emigrated before the rest of the family. He lived until he was 95 years of age and died on 24 August 1940.[3]

Some of the articles refer to his life before he moved to Australia. He talked about how he worked as a farm labourer in Paulstown and that the wage of the time was 4d (pence). The landowner that he worked for used to feed his workers and they were given “stir about” to eat.[4] This was a dish of coarse meal that was well boiled and eaten with milk. They were given this three times a day and got potatoes now and then. O’Rourke only ate meat once in his life before moving to Australia, stating that “I only tasted meat on one occasion and that was when my father and I were in Paulstown one day – we had a chop between us”. [5]

O’Rourke even had links to people in Paulstown who were born in the late 1700s. He outlined in one interview that when he was a boy an 80 year old man used to visit their house and tell them “tales of the early days”.[6]


[1] Author Unknown, Mr. T O’Rourke Celebrates 94th Birthday in The Longreach Leader, 10 September 1938, p.19; digital image, National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au : accessed 1 April 2011

[2] Author Unknown, A Race for Life in The Longreach Leader, 1 December 1937, p.16; digital image, National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au : accessed 1 April 2011

[3] Author Unknown, Death of Mr. T O’Rourke at Longreach in Rockhampton Morning Bulletin, 26 August 1940, p.8; digital image, National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au : accessed 1 April 2011

[4] Ibid.

[5] Author Unknown, Mr. Thomas O’Rourke Celebrated 95th Birthday in Rockhampton Morning Bulletin, 13 September 1939, p.9; digital image, National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au : accessed 1 April 2011

[6] Author Unknown, Mr. T O’Rourke Celebrates 94th Birthday in The Longreach Leader, 10 September 1938, p.19; digital image, National Library of Australia, http://trove.nla.gov.au : accessed 1 April 2011

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