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Archive for November, 2011

A recent article in the Irish Times highlighted one Kilkenny man’s quest to photograph all parochial houses in Ireland. The parochial house in Paulstown is included and can be viewed on this page. The house was the residence of the parish priest up to the late 1990s when it was purchased by the Barrett family. The parish priest now lives in a residence in Goresbridge village.

Currently, I am unaware of when the house was built. An aerial photo of the village, from the beginning of the 1900s, shows that it was built by this stage.[1] Likewise it appears on the OSI maps from the late 19th century and early 20th century.


[1] Paulstown Education and Historical Society (2007) Paulstown School Past and Present Paulstown, Kilkenny: Grange Silvia Publications. p.15

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The following story appeared in an 1841 edition of The Standard newspaper, which had copied an article from the Carlow Sentinel. It talked about an attack at an area called the Royal Oak which is near Bagenalstown, a couple of miles inside the Carlow border from Paulstown.

A respectable elector named Andrew Marshall, was violently assaulted, and would have been killed but for the protection afforded him by Mr. Nash, the coach agent. The state of the village these six weeks past is disgraceful to any county pretending to civilization; and if the government do not send a party of police to preserve the peace, it is impossible to say what the consequences may be, as it is invaded every night by mobs from Paulstown, county of Kilkenny, and that district.[1]


[1] Author Unknown, Disorganised Condition of the County of Carlow in The Standard, 10 August 1841, p.1; 19th Century British Library Newspapers http://newspapers.bl.uk : accessed 4 November 2011

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Kellymount, the townland which makes up one third of the village of Paulstown, is named after Joseph Keally/Kelly (1673-1713). Previous to this it was known as Ballimcloghlin[1], Baile Mhic Lachna in Irish[2]. The earliest instance of a name for the area comes from the Calendar of Deeds of the 1220s with Balimaclacth given.[3]

Joseph Keally, was a descendant of Maurice O’Kelly, who had fled from county Offaly after the massacre of Irish chieftains at Mullaghmast about 1578.[4] O’Kelly settled in the Gowran area and over the following decades the family name changed to Keally. Joseph Keally was born in 1673 to John Keally and Elizabeth Cuffe, daughter of Captain Joseph Cuffe of Castle Inch, Kilkenny.[5] Keally married Elizabeth Monke in 1707.[6]


[1] Like most Irish place names before standardization there are many spellings. This version comes from ‘Pender’s Census’ of 1659

[2] ‘Placenames Database of Ireland’, database, logainm.ie http://logainm.ie/Viewer.aspx?text=kellymount&streets=no : accessed 4 November 2011, entry for Kellymount

[3] Ibid.

[4] Lynch, Kathleen. 1938. Congreve’s Irish Friend Joseph Keally in Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (PMLA). Vol 53, No, 4, p. 1077

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid., p.1081

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The following story appeared in an 1833 edition of The Morning Post newspaper, which had copied an article from the Kilkenny Moderator.[1]

About one o’clock on Monday morning an armed party of men attacked the dwelling house of a farmer named Carroll, residing in the parish of Paulstown, and barony of Gowran, and after smashing his windows, forced an entrance onto the house, gave him a severe beating, and carried off his daughter. A fellow named Buckley, suspected of having been concerned in the above gross outrage, was subsequently arrested by some of the police stationed at Baurnafea, and brought before Walter Molony, Esq., C.M., for examination. He has since been committed to our county gaol, on suspicion of having been concerned in the burglary, and abduction.


[1] Author Unknown, County Kilkenny in The Morning Post, 14 September 1833, p.4; 19th Century British Library Newspapers http://newspapers.bl.uk : accessed 4 November 2011

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