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Archive for December, 2010

I have compiled a listing of all those who gave their ‘origin location’ (home) as Paulstown in the Assisted Immigrant Passenger List to New South Wales Australia 1828-1896[1] . Assisted immigrants were those who had their passage partly or wholly paid by another person or by an agency. Those who mention Paulstown show up between the years 1849-1867. This, of course, covers the year of The Famine and would be one of the main reasons why people emigrated.

In all, 44 people are listed. Compared with passenger lists to America of the same time period, the genealogical information they provide is excellent. The immigrant had to provide their name, age, parents names, occupation and if they had any relations in Australia. Unfortunately, not all of these lists were legible. Where this is the case the unknown word is signified by _____ . A question mark after a word indicates I am pretty sure that is it. Some people have two dates listed. The first date refers to the “List of Immigrants Per Ship’ and is the day the ship arrived. The second date refers to the “List of Immigrants Per Ship as Inspected by the Immigration Board”. Some people did not have the second document available for examination.

This list shows how many of the young people of the Paulstown area left for Australia, most likely never to return. In a good few cases siblings travel together or in chain migration, following each other after a couple of years. No doubt, many more people from the Paulstown area emigrated to Australia in the 19th and 20th centuries. Hopefully I will be able to document these people as time progresses. If anyone has information on an ancestor from Paulstown who emigrated to Australia, and they are not listed here, then I would be very grateful if you could add their information in  a comment under this blog entry.

The first entry, for Catherine Balkin, has a piece of information which is fantastic find for a genealogist, and any of her descendants.

The file is in PDF format and can be opened and downloaded.

Paulstown People Emigrating to Australia 1849-1867


[1] Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Assisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1828-1896 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data:

  • New South Wales Government. “Returns of convicts applications for wives and families to be brought to New South Wales at Government expense.” Series 1190, Reel 699. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Persons on bounty ships (Agent’s Immigrant Lists).” Series 5316, Reels 2134-2143. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Persons on early migrant ships (Fair Copy).” Series 5310, Reel 1286. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Wage agreements and entitlement certificates of persons on bounty ships (Agent’s Immigrant Lists).” Series 5315, Reels 2449-2456. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Persons on bounty ships to Sydney, Newcastle, and Moreton Bay (Board’s Immigrant Lists).” Series 5317, Reels 2458-2498. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Persons on bounty ships arriving at Port Phillip (Agent’s Immigrant Lists).” Series 5318, Reels 2143A-2145. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Passengers arriving at Sydney 1846 (Agent’s Immigrant Lists).” Series 5326, Reel 2457. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.
  • New South Wales Government. “Germans on bounty ships.” Series 5320, Reel 851. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales.

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Despite being a small village, Paulstown has been associated with people who have gone on to leave their mark in the history books. One such person was PJ Medlar (1885-1949). There is a very interesting article about him, and his family, on the Pue’s Occurances Irish History Blog, written by Pól Ó Duibhir.

You can access the article here.

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One of the most valuable genealogical record sets about the famine and post-famine Irish in New York are those of the Emigrant Savings Bank. Established in 1850 by the Irish Emigrant Society, it was the bank of choice for many thousands of Irish people who lived in New York. What makes the records such a valuable resource is that the answers that people submitted for security questions were often the names of relatives, the year they came to the US, the ship they came on and the Irish county they were born in.

In all, over 1,400 individuals list Kilkenny as their place of birth, but only a minority give further details within county Kilkenny. Of those, one person, a Johanna Whelan lists her place of birth as Paulstown.[1] No surrounding townlands or civil parishes are listed in the records. All the information she gave is provided below. It gives a good example of the kind of information that is available if you find an ancestor in these records.

Test Book: Entry 453

Date: 22 May 1862

Name: Johanna Whelan (could not write)

Address:  40 W 23rd St

Occupation: Domestic

Born: 1828

Where Born: Paulstown, Kilkenny, Ireland

Came to US: 1857 on the Thornton

Other info: Is a widow of Michael Moloney, no children, also a brother in New York – John


[1] Ancestry.com. New York Emigrant Savings Bank, 1850-1883 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. Original data: Emigrant Savings Bank. Emigrant Savings Bank Records. Call number *R-USLHG *ZI-815. Rolls 1-20. New York Public Library, New York, New York.

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One of the most well known early 19th century books which describes Ireland in detail is A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland by Samuel Lewis. Lewis had previously published a topographical dictionary of England and Wales before completing his work on Ireland. Lewis commented on how his work in Ireland was made considerably harder than his work in England and Wales, noting that “the extreme paucity of such works, in relation to Ireland, imposed the necessity of greater assiduity in the personal survey, and proportionately increased the expense.”[1]

Lewis provides an account of all the civil parishes in Ireland.  He notes the number of inhabitants, principal features and those who make up the local nobility.  You can read the entries for the civil parishes of Shankill and Kilmacahill below.

Clicking on the page brings you to Google Books where you can increase the page size for easier reading.


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